Salted with Sharks

Archive for the ‘Open Season’ Category

Special Council Meeting Regarding Elberta Beach

In E Beach, Gov't Watch, Law & Order, Open Season, Public Safety, Wildlife on August 9, 2017 at 1:36 pm

Update! Kristi Mills came through with a recording of the meeting. Thanks, Kristi! It’s a bit hard to hear and hasn’t been edited for levels and whatnot, but it’s worth a listen if you care about the beach.

 

Here are some of the officials and others who attended the meeting. We thank them! And thanks, Jon Keillor, for taking this photo.

Here are some images that were used during this morning’s special council meeting to discuss where exactly Elberta property and the public “roadway” is, as opposed to Sand Products Corporation and other private property used by Elberta beachgoers pedestrian and motorized. Thanks for the photos, Andy Bolander. I tried to record the meeting but had a tech fail. —Emily Votruba

Help Shape the Future of Elberta

In Community Alert, E Beach, Infrastructure and Planning, On and off the Apron, Open Season on August 2, 2017 at 12:51 pm

The Planning Commission will be holding a special meeting Tuesday, August 15 at 6 pm to discuss the results of the survey that was mailed out in June and formulate the community’s vision for our new master plan. Please attend!

Guest Column: Electric Skateboard Debate Ramps Up

In Activism, Breaking, Community Alert, Elsewhere in BenCo..., Environment, Gov't Watch, Infrastructure and Planning, Law & Order, On and off the Apron, Open Season, Politics, Public Safety, Tech, Transportation, WTFF (What the Frankfort) on July 14, 2017 at 5:03 pm

Please help stop Frankfort City Council’s ongoing effort to create an ordinance banning electric skateboards citywide.

By Carolyn Thayer

July 14, 2017

I’m asking for your help to spread the news about the Frankfort City Council’s ongoing effort to create an ordinance banning electric skateboards citywide based on the potential for a public safety problem.

Read the rest of this entry »

Baby’s Breath: Scourge of America

In E Beach, Environment, Open Season, Wildlife on May 18, 2017 at 10:49 am

Baby’s breath: Nice in a wedding bouquet or a prom corsage (maybe), but not so nice when it takes over your whole beach, pushing out native plants that naturally grow almost nowhere else besides our unique shoreline.

You can help work to remove these shrubby masses from our beach by joining forces with the Invasive Species Network on volunteer bee days this summer. Enjoy the beach, work your hockey muscles, and meet cool people. Wear long pants and gloves, because there’s natural poison ivy out there, too. And we like that. —Emily Votruba

 

Elberta Farmers Market Calendars on Sale Now

In Calendar, Elberta Farmers' Market, Farmers' Market, GOOD NEWS, Open Season on April 14, 2017 at 10:25 am

*Now available on Etsy! Ask for the volume discount of 5 calendars for $15*

The Elberta Farmers Market opens its 2017 season on May 18 at 8 am, and you’ll be all ready for it with the first-ever Elberta Farmers Market Calendar! On sturdy, glossy cardstock, this one-page calendar poster is perfect for your kitchen wall or refrigerator, and will keep you posted on market days and times and what’s in season every week. It even has space for sticky notes about other things you have to remember. For just $5, you can support the market and have a beautiful reminder of one of the best things about Elberta in the summertime. Get yours now and start planning all the great meals you’ll make with local produce week by week, from our hands to your table. So many thanks to Parks & Rec member Jason Soderquist for the wonderful graphic design and production work! Call market mistress Sue Oseland (231) 383-5904 or Emily Votruba (231) 399-0098, or stop by the Village office.

The first-ever Elberta Farmers Market Calendar, available now for the 2017 season for just $5.

Coyote Crossing: November Council Meeting Reports

In Community Alert, Farmers' Market, Gov't Watch, Infrastructure and Planning, On and off the Apron, Open Season, Politics, Public Safety, Village Money Situation, Water on December 7, 2016 at 2:22 am

By Emily Votruba

Regular Meeting, November 17, 2016

On the way to the regular council meeting, Linda Manville saw a coyote cross the road in front of her. The meeting was held at the Life Saving Station for the first time ever as far as anyone could remember. The room didn’t have a flag, so allegiance was pledged to an image of Old Glory brought up on someone’s phone.

A long pause was heard before the “second” on the approval of bills motion. Joyce Gatrell asked Ken Holmes if he had his hearing aid on. “Hah?” Ken said. Everyone laughed. Holly O’Dwyer said, “Ken hears better than most.”

The next quarterly meeting between Village officials and the Michigan Department of Treasury to check on the Village’s deficit elimination progress will take place Read the rest of this entry »

Ham from EN64VP

In Culture Bluffs, E Beach, Open Season, Tech on September 18, 2016 at 3:37 pm

160918-em_lookout-elberta-org-dsc2598

September 18, 2016

A group of ham radio operators are up on the overlook today attempting to “work” some of their colleagues over in Wisconsin. It’s part of a microwave contest. Some plan to stick around all day and some are heading down to Chicago later, sending signals down the coast as they go. Their homemade gear is supercool looking! A bit of fun trivia: Elberta’s call location is in EN64VP. One of the operators I spoke to, Gary, is a veteran of the telecommunications industry from back when the government was trying to break up Ma Bell. He showed the Alert some of his equipment and explained how a bit of rain, not overhead but in the signal’s path, could push his call distance much farther. Read the rest of this entry »

Hunting in the Village: Let the Game Begin

In Community Alert, Environment, Law & Order, Open Season, Wildlife on September 15, 2016 at 10:39 am

It’s hunting season! But it’s illegal to shoot firearms within Village limits. That includes up in the dunes. So if you hear gunshots here in Elberta, you would be correct to call the Sheriff, who is tasked with enforcing that law, because it’s also a state law. Bowhunting, however, is allowed in EDNA, as long as regulations, including legal distances from structures, are followed. EDNA hikers should be aware that there may be archery going on in the park during their visit. Hey, Blaze Orange looks good on everyone! This notice is posted on the Village website here.

screenshot-2016-09-15-09-45-50

And a-One and a-Two: Village Weighs Proceeding with Restroom Project with Partial Grant Funding

In Breaking, Community Alert, Elberta Farmers' Market, Farmers' Market, Infrastructure and Planning, Open Season, Village Money Situation, Water on June 5, 2016 at 8:00 pm

By Emily Votruba, Parks & Rec Secretary

At the February Parks and Rec meeting this year, Elberta Farmers’ Market master Sue Oseland presented a proposal to apply for a $70K USDA grant for permanent, piped restroom facilities at the Penfold/Farmers’ Market park. The restroom would be 10×20 with two separate ADA-compliant family restrooms. The facility would be locked at night and would shut down completely from late October to beginning of May.

For many years now the Market and Penfold Park have been served by two porta-potties. The Parks and Rec Commission and the Village Council agreed that permanent facilities would better serve Farmers Market patrons and vendors during the season as well as people who use the Betsie Valley Trail, which has an important junction there at M-22. The Parks & Rec Commission voted to support Sue’s application and voted to kick in another $5K for a drinking fountain if the grant was received.

The Village received word June 3 that the USDA had accepted the proposal but due to their own budget constraints are prepared to award only $50K of the original $70K requested. Before making their offer official, USDA needs to know whether the Village would still proceed with the project with this partial funding. The deadline to let them know is June 10.

Parks & Rec and the Village Council will hold a special joint meeting June 9 at 6:30 in the Community Building to decide if they can commit to do the project with the lesser funding amount and/or commit Village funds to the project. The Village is still in a deficit situation, despite progress in shaving it down; six years after the Village was placed on watch by the state for fiscal stress, our revised Deficit Elimination Plan has still not yet been accepted by the Treasury Department. Avoiding cost overruns is certainly top of mind for everyone.

P&R and Council hope the community will come out for this very important discussion. Can we complete this project for $50K? And/or can we count on additional support from the community to bring us up to the projected $70K? The Parks & Rec Commission feels that a safe, up-to-date, attractive facility would be a huge asset to the market, the park, the trail, and our human community here in the Village. Please come and tell the Village leadership what you think. Ψ

Lines in the Sand

In Community Alert, Crime, E Beach, Environment, Law & Order, Open Season, Public Safety, Water, Wildlife on May 24, 2016 at 1:46 pm

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

By Andy Bolander

Here is an annual reminder of the beautiful frailty our community possesses in the Elberta dunes and beach. It will take persistent and vocal presence for us to protect this resource.

Why is it necessary to protect the dune habitat? Well, something you may feel intuitively is actually true: Elberta Dunes are geologically unique in the world.

“Elberta Dunes lie at a latitudinal transition point between perched dunes to the north and lake-plain dunes to the south. Elberta dunes consist of five parabolic dunes perched on a glacial bluff. Characterized by stabilized dunes with overlapping arms which indicate non-concurrent periods of migration. Elberta Dunes have four distinguishable migration periods.” —Dunes in a Transitional Zone: Using Morphology and Stratigraphy to Determine the Relative Ages of Green Point Dune Complex and Elberta Dunes, Emma Fulop, Davidson College 2014

“Very few dunes in Michigan can be classed as truly migratory.” —Geological Sketch of Michigan Sand Dunes, Robert W. Kelly, Mich Dept of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Geological Survey Division, 2001

“[T]he greatest dunes of the entire region occur along the east coast of Lake Michigan because the prevailing Westerlies gather added energy as they fetch across this unbroken expanse of lake.” —Geological Sketch of Michigan Sand Dunes, Robert W. Kelly, Mich Dept of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Geological Survey Division, 2001

Human activity on the beach has the potential to change the shape of the dune. Vehicle tracks and the digging out of vehicles kills and/or displaces grasses, shrubs, and other vegetation that stabilizes the dunes. Removal of plant life exposes the sand to the wind and water erosion.

“Whenever plants on the foredune are injured or destroyed, the wind has access to the raw sand and creates a blowout, a saddle-shaped breach in the ridge, through which the sand commences a march inland. Many blowouts change the foredune into a very irregular feature called a dune ridge.” —Geological Sketch of Michigan Sand Dunes, Robert W. Kelly, Mich Dept of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Geological Survey Division, 2001

Dunes along the Lake Michigan coast have vanished before because of human activity. Pigeon Hill in Muskegon was named for the massive number of passenger pigeons that roosted there up until the end of the 19th century. The hill was sold to Nugent Sand and the Pere Marquette Railroad in 1920. By 1936 Sand Products Corporation (owner of about 180 acres of Elberta sand dunes and bluffs) had erected a conveyor system to load the sand onto waiting boats. Excavation of the sand continued until 1967. The site then sat barren until 1992, when there was a change in ownership and Harbour Towne condominiums were built. (http://www.actorscolony.com/) Dune sand mining also destroyed huge dunes that once surrounded Manistee.

But you don’t have to be a large sand mining corporation or a real estate developer to do a lot of damage to these natural areas and to the birds and other creatures who make Elberta Beach their home. The beach and dunes are subject to the everyday threat of human vehicle traffic.

“People are drawn to shorelines for their beauty and recreational opportunities so the remaining shoreline areas with dune habitat are often also public use areas. Hikers and Off Road Vehicles (ORVs) trample Pitcher’s thistle [a protected species] which harms or destroys the plants. ORV traffic in dunes also causes erosion which creates unstable areas where it’s difficult for plants to take hold. Pitcher’s thistle and its dune habitat are also destroyed for the creation and maintenance of public beaches.” —US Fish & Wildlife Service, Fact Sheet: Pitcher’s Thistle, updated 5/2001

“Off-road vehicles, which ruin habitat, crush nests and eggs, and directly kill birds by running over them are a key threat. Chicks that move across primary vehicle paths on their way to feed are in particular danger — especially when they get stalled alongside tall tire-track edges or stuck inside ruts. To save piping plovers from vehicle mortality, the Center has been working hard to keep off-road vehicles out of precious habitat through our Off-road Vehicles campaign. We’re also gearing up to petition the Secretary of the Interior and the Fish and Wildlife Service to establish rules that prohibit motorized vehicle use in all designated critical habitat and on all federal, state-owned, and state-managed public lands within piping plover habitat.” — http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/species/birds/piping_plover/

“The Great Lakes population of the piping plover is at a perilously low level. Since 1983, the number of nesting pairs has ranged from 12 to 32. In 2000, all of the Great Lakes pairs nested in Michigan.” —US Fish & Wildlife Service, Fact Sheet: Piping Plover

“Piping plovers are very sensitive to the presence of humans. Too much disturbance causes the parent birds to abandon their nest. People (either on foot or in a vehicle) using the beaches where the birds nest sometimes accidentally crush eggs or young birds. Dogs and cats often harass and kill the birds. Other animals, such as fox, gulls, and crows, prey on the young plovers or eggs.” —US Fish & Wildlife Service, Fact Sheet: Piping Plover

The beach and dunes are arguably the greatest asset that Elberta possesses; the village has a handful of businesses and no industry. Most of us who live here have chosen this place, or have stayed here, because we love the beach and the dunes and the forest around them. Allowing the impact of humans to change our unique natural system to a conventional mess would be a great shame. It’s up to the people who live here and the visitors who come to enjoy the beach to treat it with the respect and care it, and we all, deserve. It’s up to locals to demand that visitors behave responsibly and not destroy this amazing place.

We have been given a great responsibility. There is literally nowhere on earth like this beach and dune environment.

Driving and digging out trucks and cars on the beach and dunes not only crushes the nests of piping plovers, hurts the habitat of the Lake Huron locust, wormwood, horsetail, coreopsis, wood lilies, and other native wildlife, but it also hurts the human community. It upsets people who gently walk the beach and live through hard winters here in order to enjoy summer. It upsets people who pay taxes to keep local services running. We don’t have the manpower within local law enforcement or the DNR to deter the destructive activity that goes on down at the beach. So we need to get together as a community and protect this by demonstrating responsible behavior.

In recent years both the Village of Elberta and private citizens have spent money and time posting signs to try to cut down on off-road traffic on the beach. Vandals have removed these signs and in some cases set fire to them. Dollars have been spent and wasted on these selfish individuals, and to no avail.

I don’t have a solution today, but I hope that sharing and refreshing this knowledge of how truly special this environment is will help us keep talking until we do reach a solution.

In the meantime, if you see vehicles driving on the dunes or beach, call the DNR hotline at 800-292-7800, and/or try to get a photograph of the vehicle and its license plate.